For design files, software & more http://archive.iorodeo.com
Cart 0

News — electrochemistry

Square wave anodic stripping voltammetry and metal testing

electrochemistry lead potentiostat rodeostat

Square wave anodic stripping voltammetry and metal testing

The Rodeostat python library has several electrochemistry programs currently implemented including cyclic voltammetry, constant voltage, linear sweep, chronoamperometry and more. We have recently added a square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) program to the library. Stripping voltammetry is a powerful electroanalytical technique for the detection of trace metals in the ppb range (more about this below). In this blog post we use SWASV with the Rodeostat potentiostat to measure lead using a commercial bismuth screen printed electrode. Bismuth has gained alot of attention as a suitable non-toxic replacement for mercury electrodes (hanging-drop or thin film electrodes). Bismuth can form alloys with many metals. Lead, zinc and...

Read more →


Cyclic voltammetry with the Rodeostat

electrochemistry potentiostat rodeostat

Cyclic voltammetry with the Rodeostat

In a previous blog post we explored the irreversible redox reaction of ascorbate using the Rodeostat potentiostat. In this blog post we carried out a cyclic voltammetry experiment with ruthenium hexamine Ru(NH3)6 a reversible redox couple.  An example voltammogram of this redox couple is demonstrated in the Pine electrode literature and we have previously described this experiment using the Cheapstat potentiostat. Here we have repeated this cyclic voltammetry experiment using the Rodeostat potentiostat. A Pine screen printed carbon electrode was also used.  Equipment Rodeostat with screen printed adapter (ver A) Pine screen printed carbon electrode Micropipettes Microcentrifuge tubes Reagents 1) 0.1M KCl  To prepare 500 mL...

Read more →


Open source potentiostat features

electrochemistry potentiostat rodeostat

Open source potentiostat features

The Rodeostat (previously known as the Potentiostat Shield) is our newly designed open source potentiostat. We have received a number of questions regarding how the new potentiostat differs from the popular Cheapstat. In this blog post we give a quick overview of some of the main differences between the two open source potentiostats.  Voltage Ranges Rodeostat:  +/- 1, 2, 5, and 10V  Cheapstat:  -0.8 to 1.6V Current Ranges Rodeostat: +/- 1, 10, 100, and 1000uA  Cheapstat: +/- 10 and 50uA  Analog Input/Output Resolution Rodeostat: 12-bit analog output for each voltage range and 16-bit analog input for each current range (13-bits usable) Cheapstat: approx. 2400 values for analog output and approx....

Read more →


Cyclic voltammetry testing with the new Potentiostat Shield

electrochemistry potentiostat

Cyclic voltammetry testing with the new Potentiostat Shield

In this blog post we provide data from our testing of the new Potentiostat Shield. We performed a side-by-side comparison between the Potentiostat Shield and the Cheapstat potentiostat using ascorbate cyclic voltammetry experiments. Ascorbate is a commonly used example of irreversible cyclic voltammetry (CV). This method can be used to determine the concentration of ascorbate in liquids such as orange juice as described in the originial Cheapstat paper by Rowe et al (2011).  Cyclic Voltammetry Methods We have previously posted a method for ascorbate cyclic voltammetry using the Cheapstat and screen printed carbon electrodes here. We repeated this test with a range of ascorbate concentrations (0.5 - 10 mM) with both the new Potentiostat Shield and the...

Read more →


IO Rodeo Open Source Potentiostat Shield

electrochemistry potentiostat

IO Rodeo Open Source Potentiostat Shield

We have recently been working on a new potentiostat shield. The potentiostat shield is an open source potentiostat for performing electrochemical measurements which is designed to work with the teensy 3.2 development board.  The potentiostat shield is easily programmed with the popular Arduino IDE (Teensyduino) which enables users to expand the design as it is easily hackable with popular, well-documented tools. Multiple voltage and current ranges making it a very flexible instrument.  Below is an image of a prototype (Teensy not shown). Hardware Some of the main features include: Designed as a shield for teensy 3.2 development board. 12-bit voltage output with four range...

Read more →